Teaching Your Kids How to Use a Ruler

Comment

Teaching Your Kids How to Use a Ruler

Every student needs to know how to measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tape.

And many of them need visual and concrete examples of how to use a measurement tool, like a ruler, before they become comfortable using them.

If you are looking to teach kids how to use a ruler (or how to read a ruler) to measure inches, you can start with a fun, visual introduction that explains how to measure objects.

 

The following how to use a ruler video lesson is an introduction to using a ruler to measure inches and it includes whole numbers and fractions. 

The lesson also includes a free ruler practice PDF worksheet that corresponds with the video. You can download yours here.

(Learning Standard: Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tape.)

If you find the video helpful, please give it a thumbs-up on YouTube, leave a comment, and subscribe to our channel. Your support is greatly appreciated :)

(Never miss a Mashup Math blog--click here to get our weekly newsletter!)

By Anthony Persico

Anthony is the content crafter and head educator for YouTube's MashUp Math and an advisor to Amazon Education's 'With Math I Can' Campaign. You can often find me happily developing animated math lessons to share on my YouTube channel . Or spending way too much time at the gym or playing on my phone.

Comment

Are You Ready for 17 Awesome New Math Challenges?

10 Comments

Are You Ready for 17 Awesome New Math Challenges?

Winter vacation is over and teachers are taking on the challenge of engaging students and getting them refocused and thinking mathematically again.

Many teachers utilize engaging activities to kickstart the new year and get their kids excited about learning math.

So, in the spirit of getting students excited (and feeling challenged), I have created the following collection of free New Years Math Challenges for you to share with your kids!

Each printable math worksheet shares a challenge question (answers are included) appropriate for all elementary and middle school grade levels.

Parents can also share these fun challenge questions with your kids to keep them engaged and thinking mathematically outside of school.

Now let's get problem-solving!


1.) Day 1 of 17

(Hint: Start with the chicks!)

Koala Bear = 7

Camel = 3

Chick = 11

Gorilla = 4


2.) Day 2 of 17

(Hint: Start with the grapes!)

Pineapple = 4

Strawberry = 12

Grape = 12

Watermelon = 2

? = 26


3.) Day 3 of 17

(Hint: The racket and the arrow both represent the same value!)

Bowling = 50

Basketball = 25

Arrow = 5

Racket = 5


4.) Day 4 of 17

(Hint: Start with the blue cars!)

Blue Car = 9

Scooter = 7

Helicopter = 8

Jet = 4


5.) Day 5 of 17

(Hint: 8 minus what number is that same number?)

T.V. = 4

Camera = 8

iPhone = 4

Microscope = 6

? = 6


06.jpg

6.) Day 6 of 17

(Hint: You have to crawl before you can walk!)

Baby = 6

Hard Hat = 1

Old Man = 2

Police Officer = 6

The baby and the police officer both represent a value of 6. They are interchangeable. 



7.) Day 7 of 17

(Hint: Equivalent emojis are interchangeable!)

Yellow Face = 10

Green Face = 10

Red Face = 17

? = 17


08.jpg

8.) Day 8 of 17

(Hint: Even if you can't find the snail and the alligator individually, you know what their sum is.)

Turtle = 5

Alligator = 7 and Snail = 0, or

Snail = 7 and Alligator = 0

? = 12

One of the pair (alligator and snail) is 7 and the other is 0, but it is not possible to tell which is which.


9.) Day 9 of 17

(Hint: Start with the best food--pizza!)

Cheeseburger = 2

Taco = 8

Pizza = 3

? = 24

If the value of the cheeseburger was zero, then the value of the pizza and the taco would also become zero.


10.) Day 10 of 17

(Hint: Any nonzero value divided by itself equals one!)

Saxophone = 4

Guitar = 4

Keyboard = 4

? = 12

The value of the guitar and the value of the saxophone must be equal (and not zero), since their quotient is one! 


11.jpg

11.) Day 11 of 17

(Hint: Handle that volcano right away!)

Volcano = 1

Statue of Liberty = 3

Rocket = 6

Race Car = 2

Ferris Wheel = 18


12 copy.jpg

12.) Day 12 of 17

(Hint: Patterns, my friend...patterns!)

Pig = 2

Tiger = 3

Mouse = 4



13.) Day 13 of 17

(Hint: Think about what happens when you multiply values by zero and by one)

Avacado = 1

Pancakes = 4

Banana = 6

Donut = 8

Coffee = 0

French Fries = 16


14.) Day 14 of 17

(Hint: The whole diagram represents 182 and the two given sections represent 112. How can you distribute the difference of 70 between the two unknown sections?)

Clown Fish = 4

Octopus = 10

Shark = 40

Crab = 30

Whale = 3

Area Model: 14 x 13


15.) Day 15 of 17

(Hint: This is like a hundreds chart...kinda)

Neon Green = 510

Neon Pink = 80

Neon Blue = 220

Neon Orange = 190

Each box equals 10.


16.) Day 16 of 17

(Hint: Look for patterns within the patterns!)

Case 1: Increases by 2, then 3, then 4...

? = 17

Case 2: Each value is twice the previous value

? = 48

Case 3: Each value is one more than thrice the previous value 

? = 283


17.) Day 17 of 17

(Hint: Just play around with this one until you get it!)

Cow = 3

Fox & Boar = 6 and 7

Monkey & Frog = 8 and 4

Brown Bear & Panda = 9 and 5


Do you and your kids love our daily math challenges and puzzles? Have thoughts? Please share them in the comments below!

Get more free math resources in your inbox each week--click here to get your weekly newsletter.

By Anthony Persico

Anthony is the content crafter and head educator for YouTube's MashUp Math and an advisor to Amazon Education's 'With Math I Can' Campaign. You can often find me happily developing animated math lessons to share on my YouTube channel . Or spending way too much time at the gym or playing on my phone.

 
Pint17.jpg
 

10 Comments

How to Teach Negative Exponents to Students

Comment

How to Teach Negative Exponents to Students

Students often struggle to grasp a firm conceptual understanding of exponents, especially when negative values are involved. 

And memorizing rules and procedures will only take you so far. You have to understand topics like negative exponents if you want to excel at high levels of mathematics.

The following negative exponent video lesson is an introduction to working with negative exponents. The lesson focuses on the role of inverse operations on the different ways that you can express a negative exponent (the video includes negative exponent practice questions).

The lesson also includes a free negative exponents PDF worksheet that corresponds with the video. You can download yours here.

(Learning Standard: Know and apply the properties of zero and negative exponents (8th Grade)).

If you find the video helpful, please give it a thumbs-up on YouTube, leave a comment, and subscribe to our channel. Your support is greatly appreciated :)

(Never miss a Mashup Math blog--click here to get our weekly newsletter!)

By Anthony Persico

NewBlogImage.png

Anthony is the content crafter and head educator for YouTube's MashUp Math and an advisor to Amazon Education's 'With Math I Can' Campaign. You can often find me happily developing animated math lessons to share on my YouTube channel . Or spending way too much time at the gym or playing on my phone.

 

Comment

A Simple Activity for Teaching Kids Volume

Comment

A Simple Activity for Teaching Kids Volume

Topics like volume can be abstract and hard-to-grasp for many of your students who need visual representations and examples of topics in order to understand them.

The following video lesson explores how to use formulas to find the volume of a cylinder in the context of a word problem. You can share it with your visual learners to help them gain a deeper conceptual understanding of volume.

The lesson also includes a free PDF worksheet download that corresponds with the video. You can get it here.

 

(Learning Standard: Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving volume of cylinders, cones, and spheres.)

If you find the video helpful, please give it a thumbs-up on YouTube, leave a comment, and subscribe to our channel. Your support is greatly appreciated :)

(Never miss a Mashup Math blog--click here to get our weekly newsletter!)

By Anthony Persico

Anthony is the content crafter and head educator for YouTube's MashUp Math and an advisor to Amazon Education's 'With Math I Can' Campaign. You can often find me happily developing animated math lessons to share on my YouTube channel . Or spending way too much time at the gym or playing on my phone.

Comment

Are You Ready for 12 Days of Holiday Math Challenges?

34 Comments

Are You Ready for 12 Days of Holiday Math Challenges?

Teaching math during the holiday season is challenging.

Your kids' focus is, to say the least, diverted as their enthusiasm and excitement grows with each passing day.

Savvy teachers can take advantage of students' enthusiasm by incorporating holiday-themed activities into their lesson plans.

I know that preparing activities can be time-consuming, so my gift to you this holiday season is the 12 Days of Holiday Math Challenges

The following printable holiday math worksheets allow you to inject a little bit of merry mathematics into each daily lesson from now until Christmas break.

Each holiday math worksheet shares a challenge question (answers are included) appropriate for all elementary and middle school grade levels.

Parents can also share these fun challenge questions with your kids to keep them engaged and thinking mathematically while on break from school.

Now let's get problem-solving!


1.) Day One of Twelve

(Hint: Notice that one shopping bag is equivalent to two snowmen!)

Snowman = 6

Shopping Bags = 12

Star = 14

 

Day1.jpg

Day2.jpg

2.) Day Two of Twelve

(Hint: Start with the reindeer!)

Penguin = 9

Reindeer = 7

Fox = 1

Dove = 5


3.) Day Three of Twelve

(Hint: Notice that the reindeer and the snowflake are equivalent!)

Tree = 8

Snowman = 1

Reindeer = 4

Snowflake = 4


4.) Day Four of Twelve

(Hint: Start with the ribbon and use it to find the value of the present!)

Cookies = 10

Milk = 5

Present = 7

Ribbon = 8


5.) Day Five of Twelve

(Hint: Save coffee and dessert for later!)

Pancakes = 13

Coffee = 4

Cake = 7

 


6.) Day Six of Twelve

(Hint: What value minus three plus itself will equal 13?)

Present = 8

Snowman = 5

Carrot = 2

Chipmunk = 6


7.) Day Seven of Twelve

(Hint: What value subtracted from 12 is that same value?)

Gingerbread Man = 25

Bells = 15

Candy Cane = 6


8.) Day Eight of Twelve

(Hint: All trees are created equal!)

Tree = 9

Cake = 10

Candy Cane = 1

Sum: 20


9.) Day Nine of Twelve

(Hint: Each value comes from doing something to the previous value)

Each value is one more than three times the value of the number that comes before it. 

? = 121


10.) Day Ten of Twelve

(Hint: The growth pattern is exponential!)

1,3,6,10,...

Notice that the first value increases by 2, the second value increases by 3, the third value increases by 4, etc.

Case 5: 15 Candy Canes

Case 8: 36 Candy Canes

What about case 100?

 


11.) Day Eleven of Twelve

(Hint: Remember the multiplicative identity!)

Present: 0

Tree = 1

Candy Cane = 2

Cookie: 0

Snowman = 4

Snowflake: 5


12.) Day Twelve of Twelve

(Hint: You need to visualize this situation by drawing a diagram and/or using manipulatives and colored pencils or markers!)

Case 4: 25 Penguins

Case 5: 36 Penguins

Case n: (n+1)^2

*This question was inspired by Jo Boaler's TED Talk: How You Can Be Good at Math and Other Surprising Facts About Learning.

 


All I want for Christmas is your input! Have thoughts? Please (oh please, oh please) share them in the comments below!

(Never miss a Mashup Math blog--click here to get our weekly newsletter!)

By Anthony Persico

Anthony is the content crafter and head educator for YouTube's MashUp Math and an advisor to Amazon Education's 'With Math I Can' Campaign. You can often find me happily developing animated math lessons to share on my YouTube channel . Or spending way too much time at the gym or playing on my phone.

 
 

34 Comments