Teaching Kids How to Use a Tally Chart to Make a Picture Graph

1 Comment

Teaching Kids How to Use a Tally Chart to Make a Picture Graph

Are you looking to give your kids some practice using tally charts to represent data using a picture graph?

The following video lesson shares a fun practice problem that visually explains the relationship between tally charts and picture graphs:

Learning Standard:

Represent and Interpret Data: Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. For example, draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets.


Are you looking for more fun and colorful K-12 math video lessons that your kids will love?


By Anthony Persico

NewBlogImage.png

Anthony is the content crafter and head educator for YouTube's MashUp Math and an advisor to Amazon Education's 'With Math I Can' Campaign. You can often find me happily developing animated math lessons to share on my YouTube channel . Or spending way too much time at the gym or playing on my phone.

 
TallyChartPin.jpg
 

1 Comment

Are Your Kids Ready for 5 Days of Fall Math Challenges?

1 Comment

Are Your Kids Ready for 5 Days of Fall Math Challenges?

Are you looking for some fun seasonal math activities to keep your students focused on learning math this November?

Crafty math teachers know how to channel their student's excitement into holiday-themed activities during this time of year. And since preparing materials is time-consuming (and you're already so busy this school year as it is), my gift to you this fall is 5 Days of Fall Math Challenges

The following printable Fall Math Worksheets allow you to inject some seasonal mathematics into your lessons this month.

Each worksheet shares a challenge question (answers are included) appropriate for all elementary and middle school grade levels - they are perfect for warm-ups, exit tickets, and homework and extra credit assignments.

Parents can also share these fun challenge questions with your kids to keep them engaged and thinking mathematically this fall.

Now let's get problem-solving!

Download Instructions: You can download any of the challenges by right-clicking the image and saving it to your computer or by dragging-and-dropping each image to your desktop.


1.) Day 1 of 5

(Hint: What two numbers have a sum of 27 and a difference of 13?)

Sunflower + Corn = 13

Apple = 1

Pumpkin = 20

? = 33

 

Fall01.jpg

Fall02.jpg

2.) Day 2 of 5

(Hint: 100 is a perfect square!)

Turkey = 10

Leaves = 2

Umbrella = 20

Pumpkin Cart = 10

? = 30


3.) Day 3 of 5

(Hint: Multiplication is commutative)

Fire = 3

Umbrella = 2

Tree = 6

Apple Cider = 1

? = 12

Fall03.jpg

Fall04.jpg

4.) Day 4 of 5

(Hint: You can't have zero in the denominator of a fraction.)

Turkey = 0

Cake = 4

Beet = 16

Plate = 0

? = 64


5.) Day 5 of 5

(Hint: Start with the hat first!)

Chipmunk = 1/3

Leaf = 1

Hat = 1/2

Strawberry Jam = 1/4

 

 

Fall05.jpg

Are you looking for more daily math challenges and puzzles to share with your kids?

My best-selling workbook 101 Math Challenges for Engaging Your Students is now available as a PDF download. You can get yours today by clicking here.

 
 

Looking for more fun math resources to share with your kids? Click here to subscribe to our YouTube channel and access our free video library--and don't forget to subscribe!

(Never miss a Mashup Math blog--click here to get our weekly newsletter!)

By Anthony Persico

Anthony is the content crafter and head educator for YouTube's MashUp Math and an advisor to Amazon Education's 'With Math I Can' Campaign. You can often find me happily developing animated math lessons to share on my YouTube channel . Or spending way too much time at the gym or playing on my phone.

1 Comment

Looking For Number Talk Strategies? We Got You.

Comment

Looking For Number Talk Strategies? We Got You.

One of the best strategies for helping your kids develop number sense is by engaging in Number Talks—a pedagogical strategy where kids are required to work out a math problem mentally, without written work, and then use a subtle hand gesture to indicate that they have found a solution.

These short, daily exercises teach your kids to play around with numbers, engage in creative problem solving, express their thinking symbolically and in words, and develop flexibility in how they think about mathematics.

The following explanation by Stanford Professor and faculty director of YouCubed, Jo Boaler, shares a few examples of what number talks look like:

Whether you have never used number talks in your lessons before, or are looking to improve how you use them, the following strategies will take you to the next level:

1.) Use Hand Signals

Number Talks work best when students learn to use subtle and specific hand gestures to indicate if they have solved the problem or if they are still thinking. This strategy prevents students from raising their hands in the air when they have found a solution, which can be intimidating and anxiety-inducing for nearby students.

HandSignals.jpg

2.) Use Visuals

Students often hold a false belief that there is only way to solve any given math problem. But, in reality, mathematics is highly flexible and there are multiple ways to think about and work with numbers. By engaging with and thinking about visual mathematics, students can develop a flexibility of thinking that applies to all areas of mathematics and beyond.

Here's an example of a visual number talk using a dot card:

3.) Try Number "Stretching"

A great way to help kids develop number sense and flexible thinking skills is to have them engage in number "stretching"—the practice of manipulating numbers in a variety of ways.

GettyImages-499406739.jpg

"As they contemplate solutions, students’ minds flow through a range of interrelated number concepts: the relationship between addition and subtraction, the pairs that make ten, ordering numbers on the number line, conservation of number, and plenty more. They are building fluency while exercising number sense; they are accessing number concepts while practicing basic facts. In short, they are becoming numerically flexible" says John S. Thomas' in his blog Improving Fluency and Number Sense with Simple Number “Stretching” from Edutopia.

An example of a number "stretch" activity would be asking students to come up with as many creative strategies as possible for subtracting 13 from 25.


Need help getting your students writing about math?


Do you have more ideas for using Number Talks in the math classroom? Share your thoughts in the comments section below!

(Never miss a Mashup Math blog--click here to get our weekly newsletter!)

By Anthony Persico

NewBlogImage.png

Anthony is the content crafter and head educator for YouTube's MashUp Math and joins Jo Boaler as an advisor to Amazon Education's 'With Math I Can' Campaign. You can often find me happily developing animated math lessons to share on my YouTube channel . Or spending way too much time at the gym or playing on my phone.

 

Comment

5 Awesome 8th Grade Scientific Notation Activities

1 Comment

5 Awesome 8th Grade Scientific Notation Activities

8thGrade.jpg

Are you looking for fun and engaging activities for helping your kids understand scientific notation?

You can use the following activity ideas to differentiate your instruction and help your kids to gain a deeper conceptual understanding of this challenging topic:


  via teacherspayteachers.com

via teacherspayteachers.com

1.) Scientific Notation Sort Cards via Amazing Mathematics

Activity Description:

This hands-on sorting activity consists of 22 matching Scientific & Standard notation pairs. Students will cut out a mixture of 22 Scientific & Standard notation numbers, convert them to the other type of notation, and then glue them next to the corresponding number.

Click here to learn more.


  via teacherspayteachers.com

via teacherspayteachers.com

2.) Scientific Notation Puzzle via Math Dyal

Activity Description:

Give this hands-on activity a try for a fun way to practice writing small and large numbers using scientific notation. Students will need to "attend to precision" because several of the problems have the same coefficient but different exponents - forcing students to really focus on the function of the exponent. 

Click here to learn more.
 


MM.jpg

3.) Scientific Notation Explained in the Real-World!

(Video Lesson) via Mashup Math

Activity Description:

This animated math video lesson is the perfect introduction to the concepts and procedures associated with scientific notation. The lesson includes several real-world examples of how to use scientific notation to express large numbers such as the population of the state of Arizona!

Click here to watch the video on YouTube!


  via commoncorematerial.com

via commoncorematerial.com

4.) Foldable Wheel Graphic Organizer via Common Core Material

Activity Description:

This foldable has two layers: example and steps. Students will be solving 4 problems on adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing numbers in scientific notation. This foldable is a great handheld study tool or can be glued into their interactive notebooks. In addition, students can personalize their foldables by coloring them. Your students will love this! 

Click here to learn more.


  via teacherspayteachers.com

via teacherspayteachers.com

5.) Scientific Notation Maze via Amazing Mathematics

Activity Description:

This maze consists of 11 numbers that students must convert from standard notation to scientific notation. This maze consists of "big" and "small" numbers that require a both positive and negative exponents. Not all boxes are used in the maze to prevent students from just figuring out the route.

Click here to learn more.

 


Note: Learning Standard: Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where both decimal and scientific notation are used. Use scientific notation and choose units of appropriate size for measurements of very large or very small quantities (e.g., use millimeters per year for seafloor spreading). Interpret scientific notation that has been generated by technology.

Did I miss a great activity for teaching Scientific Notation? Share your thoughts and suggestions in the comments section below!

(Never miss a Mashup Math blog--click here to get our weekly newsletter!)

NewBlogImage.png

By Anthony Persico

Anthony is the content crafter and head educator for YouTube's MashUp Math and an advisor to Amazon Education's 'With Math I Can' Campaign. You can often find me happily developing animated math lessons to share on my YouTube channel . Or spending way too much time at the gym or playing on my phone.

 
Pin.jpg
 

1 Comment

Why You Should Be Using WODB to Ignite Student Thinking in Math

3 Comments

Why You Should Be Using WODB to Ignite Student Thinking in Math

GettyImages-858276678.jpg

Great math teachers know that the first five minutes of class are the most important—if you don't engage your kids early, then you'll be struggling to gain their attention for the entire class.

But finding fun and engaging warm-up activities can be challenging, as students can quickly become bored with routine and repetitive practice problems

If you are looking to make your math warm-ups more visual and thought-provoking, then starting your lessons with Which One Doesn’t Belong? (WODB) activities is a great strategy for instantly sparking creative and critical student thinking that will last for the entire lesson.

BlogImage.jpg

How do WODB activities work? 

Instead of working on practice problems during a lesson's warm-up, students will observe and reflect upon a graphic displaying four images. They will then apply their mathematical and reasoning skills to decide which of the four items does not belong and also justify why their choice is valid.

 

Are WODB activities like visual multiple choice questions? 

Nope.

WODB activities do not have a single correct answer. These graphics are designed to be interpreted in a variety of different ways in order to spark deep mathematical thinking and discussion (in small groups, whole class, or both).

Here's an Example:

Consider the graphic below and the different responses by Students A, B, and C.

Snip20171016_1.png

Student A says: I think 27 doesn’t belong because it is the only value that is not divisible by four. Also, 27 is the only odd number in the group.

Student B says: I think 64 doesn’t belong because all of the other numbers are either a perfect square or a perfect cube, but 64 is both!

Student C says: I think 16 doesn’t belong because it is not a perfect cube and the other three are.

Notice that all three students have engaged in deep mathematical thinking and their curiosity and interest will carry on throughout the day’s lesson!

As teacher, you can steer this discussion in a variety of directions by asking follow-up questions like:

What justification could you use to say that 8 doesn’t belong?

What other justifications could student A have used to decide that 27 does not belong?

How can students A, B, and C all be correct even though they each chose different values?

 What topics and grade levels are WODB activities best suited for?

WODB activities can be used for all grade levels and topics. The graphics can be topic/lesson specific or more broad and open-ended. Remember, the idea is to spark enough student thinking, interest, and curiosity at the beginning of your lesson to last for the entire class!

Are you ready to give it a try?

Here are a few free graphics for you to try with your kids!

Looking for more? Download your 101 WODB Warm-Up Activities for Grades 1-9 eBook!

Q08.jpg
20.jpg
01.jpg
02b.jpg

Looking for more?

You can now share 101 daily WODB warm-up activities for grades 1-9 with your kids with our PDF workbook!

And for more inspiration, graphics, and ideas check out Mary Bourassa's WODB website and Christopher Danielson's Which One Doesn't Belong? A Shapes Book.

 
BookPlug.jpg
 

Do you have experience using WODB activities with your math students? Share your thoughts and suggestions in the comments section below!

(Never miss a Mashup Math blog--click here to get our weekly newsletter!)

By Anthony Persico

NewBlogImage.png

Anthony is the content crafter and head educator for YouTube's MashUp Math and an advisor to Amazon Education's 'With Math I Can' Campaign. You can often find me happily developing animated math lessons to share on my YouTube channel . Or spending way too much time at the gym or playing on my phone.

 
pin.jpg
 

3 Comments